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      10-14-2019, 11:19 AM   #101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flacht3 View Post
Sure this may be true for the USA as a whole, but those "certain markets" you mention are the markets that are most relevant. New York, LA, Bay Area, Austin, Atlanta, Chicago, Seattle, Denver etc. are where job growth is for the average young person. Beyond job markets, most folks don't want to live in middle-of-nowhere.

You're also seeing the "death" of suburbia, where 20-30 years ago there was plentiful demand for areas 60+ minutes outside of the main metros we simply don't see the same demand today...people want to live near the cities (where supply is low) even though there are plentiful options in the burbs.

Your data is probably accurate, but doesn't actually capture the whole picture. Not everyone can just throw down roots in the middle of nowhere. Sure, many folks are piss poor with their financial planning but it's not fair to make a general statement that "cost of living is lower" and it's "the fault of people today making dumb ass financial decisions."

List of major metro areas that are NOT "certain markets" and have cost per square foot of homes at or less than what it was 50 years ago:

Tampa
Orlando
Jacksonville
Charlotte
Raleigh
Providence
Albany
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Louisville
Nashville
Chattanooga
Mobile
Houston
Dallas
El Paso
St Louis
Albuquerque
Indianapolis
Green Bay
Oklahoma City
Boise
Spokane
Salt Lake City
Reno
Santa Fe
Tulsa
Milwaukee
Springfield
Pittsburgh
Birmingham
Huntsville
Ann Arbor
Grand Rapids


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